WARNING: L-O-N-G rant: I know this site is especially for oval racing but...

raceannouncer

Racing Genius
Attention Rochester TV media outlets:  please refrain from describing the illegal, unsafe street racing recently occurring as "drag racing".  Street races are typically an unsanctioned and illegal form of auto racing that occurs on public roads. Racing in the streets is an ancient hazard, as horse racing occurred on streets for centuries, and street racing of automobiles is as old as the automobile itself.  By contrast, drag racing is a type of motor racing in which automobiles or motorcycles (usually specially prepared for the purpose) which compete on a specific, dedicated safety conscious track, with safety barriers installed to protect spectators, and these facilities are required by state law to have medical staff onsite at ALL times...Sure, the two types of racing are similar; both types of racing usually has two vehicles at a time, running to be first to cross a set finish line. The race follows a short, straight course from a standing start over a measured distance, most commonly 1?4 mi (1,320 ft; 402 m), with a shorter (1,000 ft (305 m)) distance becoming increasingly popular, as it has become the standard for Top Fuel dragsters and funny cars, where some major bracket races and other sanctioning bodies have adopted it as the standard. The 1?8 mi (660 ft; 201 m) is also popular in some circles. Electronic timing and speed sensing systems have been used to record race results since the 1960s. Professional drag racing is sanctioned by those pro organizations with specific safety measures and expensive insurance required for the facilities.  Unfortunately, illegal "street racing" activity has been recently glamorized by the cable TV show:  "Street Outlaws".  I realize this problem is not entirely new, either.  But your coverage can be damaging to places like Empire Dragway and NYIRP, located outside Buffalo.  Likewise, the Syracuse area has ESTA Raceway Park; all of these have onsite safety personnel at all times when races are being held...In addition to having their schedules revamped to adhere to government-mandated Covid-19 regulations where no paying spectators are allowed into the facilities, the last few seasons have seen unfortunate inclement weather, no matter where or what kind of auto racing activities have been scheduled.  These businesses don't need this type of unfair descriptions of these activities.
 

Oilman

Newbie
Think it is on Motor trend TV and the name is "Race Night in America."  Focuses on illegal street racing all across America in one night.  Looks similar to a Fast and Furious movie, but, with real cops and mostly real street cars running on real uncontrolled streets.
 

leadfoot4

Champion
Oilman said:
Think it is on Motor trend TV and the name is "Race Night in America."  Focuses on illegal street racing all across America in one night.  Looks similar to a Fast and Furious movie, but, with real cops and mostly real street cars running on real uncontrolled streets.

Now that you mention it, I think I did see a few minutes of a show that fits that description, a few months back..... YEARS AGO, there used to be some rather serious action in Rochester, on the Lake Ontario State Parkway, but I haven't heard of anything going on there, in a LONG time.....and even back then, it was kept pretty quiet.
 

raceannouncer

Racing Genius
The specific one I'm referring to is "Street Outlaws" and recently they're trying to be more legitimate by bringing their "circus" to actual, purpose built facilities; most notably (locally), Empire Dragway and some NHRA National Event tracks like Bristol and others...
 

leadfoot4

Champion
raceannouncer said:
The specific one I'm referring to is "Street Outlaws" and recently they're trying to be more legitimate by bringing their "circus" to actual, purpose built facilities; most notably (locally), Empire Dragway and some NHRA National Event tracks like Bristol and others...

Mike, I understand your point, HOWEVER, a person would have to be pretty naive to watch the 'Street Outlaws' program and draw the conclusion that these guys are "street racing". They show up in crew cab dualies, MINIMUM, with their "street racers" (in reality, Pro Mod cars) in a triple axle trailer. They're doing burnouts, using/tuning traction control software, as well as drag chutes.

They MAY be competing on "public roads", but the roads are shut down at the time the guys are competing. It's NOTHING like the "old days" on Lake Avenue/ the Lake Ontario State Parkway in Rochester, or the Irondequoit Bay Bridge, before the bridge was open to the public. Those were "street races"................
 

raceannouncer

Racing Genius
leadfoot4 said:
raceannouncer said:
The specific one I'm referring to is "Street Outlaws" and recently they're trying to be more legitimate by bringing their "circus" to actual, purpose built facilities; most notably (locally), Empire Dragway and some NHRA National Event tracks like Bristol and others...

Mike, I understand your point, HOWEVER, a person would have to be pretty naive to watch the 'Street Outlaws' program and draw the conclusion that these guys are "street racing". They show up in crew cab dualies, MINIMUM, with their "street racers" (in reality, Pro Mod cars) in a triple axle trailer. They're doing burnouts, using/tuning traction control software, as well as drag chutes.

They MAY be competing on "public roads", but the roads are shut down at the time the guys are competing. It's NOTHING like the "old days" on Lake Avenue/ the Lake Ontario State Parkway in Rochester, or the Irondequoit Bay Bridge, before the bridge was open to the public. Those were "street races"................

Leadfoot4:  No matter where it happens--it gives the sport a "black-eye" if something bad happens...My point is: traditional media refers to it as "drag racing" which might seem like it's just semantics--but it should be called what it is:  "illegal street racing".  NHRA is seriously concerned:  http://www.gmpowerhouses.com/2015/02/nhra-going-against-street-outlaw.html
 
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