oldies but goodies

The Waterloo photos are outstanding. I look forward to seeing more.... Another photo from the Ken Burnside collection- Gary Lulg with the #56 (no photog info)
 

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BigFeet13

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I believe these are Bob Hunter pics (except maybe the Joe Orso pic). Mike Ferguson collection.
 

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BigFeet13

Veteran
Claychamp123 said:
Who drove the three aces?....always liked the cars with unusual numbers!
Roger Dunsmore originally drove it. The car was sold to Whitey Brazak, and became the #111 that Sammy Reakes drove. I believe it ended up being Johnny Podolak's first car.
 

trivia99

Newbie
Just curious when Roger Dunsmore drove the three aces, didn't Carl Rice who shot photos and lived in Fulton own the car? Also I remember siting in the grandstands at Shangri-La back in 1962 when Dunsmore flipped the Mel Dodge Edsel powered #96 violently off turn two totally destroying the car. That wreck ranks in the top ten of worst wrecks I ever saw at that track in over forty years.
 

BigFeet13

Veteran
Carl Rice did own the car. I'm not sure what years Roger drove it (it was a bit before my time). Reakes started driving it, as the #111 in the mid 60's.
 

trivia99

Newbie
This first time I saw #111 was at a 100 lapper at Five Mile Point on Memorial Day in 1965. Sammy was a very busy boy back in the mid to late sixties. Not only did he run #111's for Whitey he also dabbled in pavement racing with a Falcon bodied car which I saw him race at both Shangri-La and Fulton. There was also a brown and white coupe with a small block Chevy which I saw him with at Reading (just starting to get my travel legs under me). From what I'm hearing Waterloo was quite a place in it's heyday. I didn't see a race there until a July 4th 100 lapper in 1968 for the full blown Modifieds. Anyway thanks for heads up on the Reakes/Brazak car.
 

BigFeet13

Veteran
I didn't start going to races until the late 60's. And then I was only like 3 years old. I remember Sammy towards the end of his career, drive Jim Sincerbeaux's pinto, the year before Danny Johnson took it over. My Dad certainly remembers him from back in the day at Waterloo and occasionally Brewerton.
 

trivia99

Newbie
I think Sincebaugh (or however you spell it) was one of the more forgotten owners of that era. Before Sammy driving the Pinto there was a great looking blue and white #0 coupe and a #15 coupe. I distinctly remember both John McArdell and Jimmy Winks in the car and maybe even John Podolak. It was always fast and always good looking. Also McArdell proved he could drive when he was away from Waterloo and the Tantello leanin' 11. I always felt he was under rated as a driver.
 

112SMW

Veteran
Chuck Ciprich drove the #0 in 1976.It was a blue coupe.
 

BigFeet13

Veteran
112SMW said:
Chuck Ciprich drove the #0 in 1976.It was a blue coupe.
Yep. Chuck flipped it at Weedsport towards the end of '76. Sincerbeaux put the pinto together for '77 and Chuck drove it part of the year. Sammy Reakes drove it in '77 and '78. The car was renumbered 0jr for '79, and Danny Johnson drove it.
 

BigFeet13

Veteran
trivia99 said:
I think Sincebaugh (or however you spell it) was one of the more forgotten owners of that era. Before Sammy driving the Pinto there was a great looking blue and white #0 coupe and a #15 coupe. I distinctly remember both John McArdell and Jimmy Winks in the car and maybe even John Podolak. It was always fast and always good looking. Also McArdell proved he could drive when he was away from Waterloo and the Tantello leanin' 11. I always felt he was under rated as a driver.
The reason it was numbered 15 is that Lloyd Holt originally drove it. Actually Sincerbeaux had a valiant #15 that Lloyd drove (bought by Jim Sperry and driven by Dick Wall). The Johnny McArdell actually won the track championship at Rolling Wheels in the #0, in '75. Chuck took over in '76. Most of the cars were Bushy chassis'.
 

trivia99

Newbie
    To be honest I had completely forgotten about the Valiant that Lloyd Holt drove. Holt was one of the better drivers of that era. His bronze coupe and coach were both eye catchers and I remember he also drove for a guy named Bob Van Fleet out of Clarks Summit, Pa. at both Five Mile Point and the now defunct Twin Valley. Now that I think about it I think he also drove for a person named Jim King down this way also. I'm not sure anybody on dirt would have ever had a Valiant bodied Modified had it not been for the Bodine car on asphalt. Not say that it wouldn't have happened but I think Geoff's car was a definite trend setter. Of all the Valiant bodied Modifieds I ever saw I honestly think the Les Alberti #473 was the sharpest. Not saying that the rest of them weren't but the Alberti car definitely stood out. I thought that no body style could ever replace the beloved coupes and coaches but the creativity of the builders and the fabrication guys back then make some very fine looking race cars out of the newer tin.
 

BigFeet13

Veteran
I had a pic of the valiant somewhere, but I can't find it. I do have it on a Weedsport program after Sperry bought it.

I saw Geoff's car for the first time in the early '70s, and it was instantly my favorite modified, and still my all time favorite. It helped that my dad had a '61 valiant at the time.
 

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trivia99

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    It's interesting to note that the compact car bodies probably date back into the early sixties when guys used the 1953 Studebaker body. Ever the innovator Dave Kneisel ran a 1951 Oldsmobile body at Five Mile Point in 1958 to take advantage of a quirky rule book which allowed overhead V8 motors if you ran a full size body of the same make. Kneisel showed up a couple of years later with a Crosley bodied creation with a full house Ford Flathead motor followed closely by a small block Chevy when the rules allowed it. That was followed closely by Stan Lupka's Henry J and Don Beagell Bantam. I still think the Kneisel Pacer of the late seventies was the ultimate "pony car" dirt body.
    Falcons and Corvairs were also "hot" in the sixties but probably the most unusual was the Bobby Merz Rambler. Bodine's Valiant was definitely ahead of the Judkins Pinto which was said to have started the small car body revolution. I found a picture of the Alberti car taken at Rolling Wheels in the earl seventies. I think it's a Mike Piano photo.
 

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trivia99

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    I also like the Schloder Valiant because of the nasty injection tubes coming through where the hood scoop should of been. Made it look kind of menacing. Well as menacing as a Valiant could look, anyway. While we're on the subject, didn't Al Tasnady drive for the early incarnation of this team at Flemington maybe in 1971 or so.
    Schloder also holds a distinction of being one of the few drivers in the "modern" era to win a feature both at Five Mile Point (2) and Shangri-La (1).
 

lynchmobb

Veteran
Dom Kreitz Sr also had a nice Valiant at Reading. I think one of the advantages of the Valiant like Bodine's was that it was a wide flat surface, creating a wing effect with the rake he used on the body. Kenny Brightbill came to Fulton on the dirt once with a Cadillac body that was pretty much pure aerodynamics. Someone also mentioned a Henry J - I remember a car that came to Spencer once in a while (Bob Burton??) - I think it was a regular at Shangri-La.
 

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